Tag Archives: trees

GardenArt Tips for Autumn

GardenArt Offers Autumn Season Tips for Your Landscape, Garden and Lawn


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As the temperatures gets cooler there are several things that may be done to prepare your landscape for the winter and spring. The experts at GardenArt wish to offer these tips and reminders for the Autumn season which has begun. As always, if you have any specific questions, email or call us (click HERE).


  • Plant hardy Mums in your landscape to add annual Fall color
  • Feed your plants – use a time release plant food with nitrogen, sulfate of potash, iron and other micro-nutrients made for perennials and flowering shrubs and trees
  • Feed Evergreens (Hollies, Boxwoods and Yews) and deciduous Trees (Maples, Oaks and Ash) with tree food with nitrogen, sulfate of potash, iron and other micro-nutrients
  • Transplant and divide Peonies and other perennials
  • Dig up and store summer bulbs (gladiolus, dahlias, cannas, and others) when they mature
  • Plant spring blooming bulbs like Iris, Tulips, Crocus, and Daffodils, Allium and Camassia
  • Plant trees, shrubs, perennials, ornamental grasses, grass seed and sod. Temperatures are cooler and conditions are better for root growth. Use a starter plant fertilizer mix to assist in that process.
  • Some Fall plants that provide color in the cooler months are as follows: Beautyberry, Cotoneaster, Viburnums, Hypericum, Hydrangeas, Potentilla, Pyracantha and Butterfly Bush.
  • Mulch your flowers beds especially newly planted bulbs, perennials, and bushes.
  • Do not prune spring blooming trees and shrubs like Lilacs and Viburnums – the buds are set already to bloom next spring and if you prune now you will lose next spring’s flowers.
  • Monitor Fall rainfall. If actual rainfall is below normal rainfall for September, October and November, water evergreens well prior to the ground freezing. Evergreens transpire during the winter and are not dormant like deciduous plants. This especially important with broad-leaved evergreens such as Boxwood, Holly, Hemlock and Rhododendron.
  • Give some attention to your Lawn –
    • Best time to seed new lawns or reseed (over-seed) established lawns
    • Great time to Aerate and/or Thatch the lawn
    • Good time to add Lime and/or Fertilize, Top-dress with organic compost, and apply grub control
    • Remember to soak your lawn a couple of days before fertilizing – then top-dress, aerate/thatch, and then seed.
  • Gardens –can still seed beets, radishes, turnips and leaf lettuce; can still plant cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, collards and lettuce.
  • Bring your houseplants back indoors – spray them and dust the soil to prevent bringing in ants, wireworms and sow bugs. Repot pot bound plants; fertilize with slow release fertilizer through November and stop feeding them until February.


The easiest way to set up a meeting with the GardenArt team to discuss your vision for improving your outdoor living space is to fill out the simple GardenArt contact form, click HERE.

Do it today!



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Remodeling and Home Design
West Lafayette Landscape Architects & Designers

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Back to School Projects


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GardenArt Goes Back to School


The past few weeks, the GardenArt crew has been working hard to assist the Tippecanoe School Corporation get ready for the first day of school. Each school had its own unique projects and designs but GardenArt stepped up and got the job done. Working to support kids especially within our public schools gives GardenArt special pride and satisfaction. Below are examples of three of the projects recently completed by GardenArt.



Burnett Creek Elementary School


In preparation for the students to return to school, the playground area needed new mulch. For a school like Burnett Creek, this is an important and massive job. GardenArt was excited to be a part of the project.


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Harrison High School


Harrison High was the recipient of monetary gift to add new trees in the Raiders’ athletic complex. It was important to get these new trees planted before the first home game. GardenArt managed the entire project for TSC and the trees look beautiful in their new home. Harrison Raiders fans and athletes will be able to enjoy this new cluster of trees for many years to come.


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Klondike Middle School


TSC needed some modifications to the main front entrance of Klondike Middle School. Tapping into GardenArt’s expertise and experience with impressive entrances, stone walls and outdoor spaces, TSC engaged the crew at GardenArt for this design and installation. The new entrance and wall was completed just in time for the onslaught of tweens and teens in just a few days.


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The easiest way to set up a meeting with the GardenArt team to discuss your vision for improving your outdoor living space is to fill out the simple GardenArt contact form, click HERE. Do it today!



Join GardenArt online and help us — Make Customers for Life.


   


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Operation Releaf 2013


GardenArt – Operation Releaf 2013


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In the spring, GardenArt was selected by the City of West Lafayette to coordinate the tree plantings for Operation Releaf 2013. The GardenArt team spent the first part of the summer ordering, delivering, and planting trees in various neighborhoods all around the City of West Lafayette.


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Operation Releaf 2013 is an initiative in the City of West Lafayette that coordinates the planting of trees twice a year to replace trees that have been lost due to old age or damage either by accident or from vandalism. The tree plantings (one each spring and one each fall) are organized by the Greenspace Administrator for the City of West Lafayette with the invaluable assistance from the West Lafayette Tree Fund. The members of the West Lafayette Tree Fund act as liaisons with the homeowners assisting in picking the species of tree and scheduling the tree delivery.


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With the adoption of the original West Lafayette Landscape Ordinance, the West Lafayette Tree Fund was founded and formed in 1981 by a small group of concerned citizen led by the late Helen Lillich. The Tree Fund is supported by private contributions, and its purpose is to plant trees and implement landscaping projects in the public right of way in the City of West Lafayette. In addition to the funds raised by the West Lafayette Tree Fund, the Operation Releaf 2013 budget is augmented by grants from the Department of Natural Resources, EnviroWatts, and Community Development Block Grant. Over 6700 street trees have been planted over the years – lining the public streets, cleaning the air, cooling the neighborhoods, shading the sidewalks, capturing storm water, and beautifying the City.


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GardenArt is proud to be an integral part of such an important and worthwhile project especially since it benefits the community in which they reside. For Operation Releaf 2013, GardenArt planted a total of 87 trees.

GardenArt was also involved in the installation of Helen’s Way in November 2010. Helen’s Way is a cluster of hundreds trees along Kalberer Road in West Lafayette named in honor of the late Helen Lillich – West Lafayette’s self-proclaimed “Tree Lady.” Until her passing in 2010, Helen Lillich dedicated her life to beautifying the city through sheer hard work and determination as a guiding force behind the founding the Tree Fund and the adoption of the original West Lafayette Landscape Ordinance.


To support Operation Releaf, go to the West Lafayette Tree Fund website – click HERE.

To view more photos of GardenArt-Operation Releaf 2013, click HERE.


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The easiest way to set up a meeting with the GardenArt team to discuss your vision for improving your outdoor living space is to fill out the simple GardenArt contact form, click HERE.

Do it today!



Join GardenArt online and help us — Make Customers for Life.



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Plant of the Week — Ruby Horsechestnut


GardenArt’s Plant of the Week:


 Aesculus x carnea ‘Fort McNair’ or ‘Briotti’ – Ruby Horsechestnut


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Ruby Horsechestnut is an outstanding, under used large ornamental tree. Attaining a height and spread of 25-30 feet, this is an ornamental for larger spaces such as open lawns or parks.

The plant produces large (6-12 inch) conical blooms in mid-Spring – this year, the plant began blooming in our area on May 9th. The bloom color is medium to deep pink and has a yellow throat. The foliage is a glossy and darker green in color. In some years, the Ruby Horsechestnut will have a yellow fall color typical of the Buckeye (Aesculus) genus. Other years, the fall color is a brown color.

ruby horsechestnutRuby Horsechestnut prefers a well-drained soil, so it is best to keep it out of low areas. On sites with new construction and marginal soils, be sure to amend the backfill with a soil amendment high in organic material.

It is common for the leaves to scorch (turn brown on the margins and/or curl) the first year it is installed. Be sure the plant receives one inch of water per week (use weather.com or weatherunderground.com to monitor rainfall). Once the plant is established, scorch is generally not a problem unless we are in a period of drought.

The plant has huge buds over the winter, offering subtle winter interest. With our winters in Indiana , we can use all the interest we can round up during those months.

If you have the space, this is a must-have ornamental for the residential or commercial landscape.


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The easiest way to set up a meeting with the GardenArt team to discuss your vision for improving your outdoor living space is to fill out the simple GardenArt contact form, click HERE. Do it today!



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Spring Delivery — Busy Day at GardenArt


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{To view more photos of “delivery day” — click HERE or any image in this post}


Today was a busy day at GardenArt HQ. A parade of box trucks and flatbeds delivered trees, shrubs, flowers and other plants all day long. The GardenArt design teams have been working hard creating beautiful outdoor living spaces on paper for clients — now it’s time to order the materials and begin installations.


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Some of these trees will be used in the West Lafayette Tree Project – ReLeaf; and many of the plants will be used in the GardenArt “Adopt-A-Spot” in Lafayette.


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The GardenArt team will be working on their Adopt-A-Spot this Saturday — just in time for Mother’s Day. READ more: HERE.


{To view more photos of “delivery day” — click HERE or any image in this post}

{To view more photos of “GardenArt’s Adopt-A-Spot Work Day” — click HERE or any image in this post}

Check back for more information on the NATIVE PLANTS used in this Adopt-A-Spot in Lafayette, Indiana.



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Plant of the Week — Korean Spice Viburnum


GardenArt’s Plant of the Week:


Korean Spice Viburnum – Viburnum Carlesi


Korean Spice Viburnum (Viburnum carlesi) is an excellent mid-sized flowering shrub for the residential garden.  With a 6’x6′ to 8’x8′ size, Korean Spice Viburnum provides flower, fruit and fall color with few significant pests.

Its most significant feature is the fragrant bloom.  Typically, bright pink flower buds emerge in early to mid-April and remain visually effective as buds for approximately seven days before opening up to a white cluster of blooms remaining visually effective for seven to ten days. The foliage is a medium to dark green with a pubescent (hairy) leaf, attractive out of bloom.  The fruit is red for a period of a few weeks, and then turns black before being eaten by birds. The fall color is orange to red, generally later in the fall color cycle (late/later in October), which helps to extend seasonal change in the garden.


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In most residential gardens, Viburnum carlesi should be used as a specimen due to its mature size. Its growth rate is three to six inches per year, making it one of the slower growing Viburnums. On larger properties, consider using it in mass where the dynamic seasonal changes are seen on a daily basis. It is important to note Korean Spice Viburnum blooms on ‘old wood,’ meaning its flower buds are set on the growth from the previous year.  In order to maintain bloom from year to year, prune after the plant is done flowering.  If you have this plant in your garden and you think it is getting too big, prune it in a week or two.  If you look at the plant mid summer or later and want to give it a whacking, wait until the following spring after it is done blooming.


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Dwarf cultivars are now in production at better wholesale nurseries.  Viburnum carlesi ‘Compactum’ offers the same ornamental features in a slightly smaller stature, perhaps as small as 5’x5′ to 6’x6′ at maturity.  Some sources list the mature size as 3’x3′, but we have seen plants available at 36 inches (it’s hard to imagine it won’t continue to grow though). The growth rate is three inches per year or less, making it a more expensive plant. Generally speaking, slow growth or dwarf signifies it will be a more expensive plant. As with any new plant introductions, mature size may not be realized for a decade or two.

Look for more Viburnums to be featured in our GardenArt Plant of the Week later in the year.  It is a diverse genus offering many options in a variety of sizes.


The easiest way to set up a meeting with the GardenArt team to discuss your vision for improving your outdoor living space is to fill out the simple GardenArt contact form, click HERE. Do it today!



Join GardenArt online and help us — Make Customers for Life.


      

Remodeling and Home Design
West Lafayette Landscape Architects & Designers

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Plant of the Week (to avoid) — Callery Pear


GardenArt’s Plant of the Week (to avoid):


Callery Pear – Pyrus calleryana Aristocrat & Pyrus calleryana Cleveland Select (various cultivars of Callery Pear)


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Prized for its uniform habit, heavy white blooms, dark glossy green foliage during the growing season, and reliable red-orange fall color, cultivars of Callery Pear such as Bradford, Aristocrat and Cleveland Select (shown above in flower) have been heavily planted over the past 20 years.

While Bradford fell out of favor in the late 1980’s to early 1990’s due to a branching habit that is susceptible to serious damage from ice or snow loads, other cultivars continued to be planted extensively.

Over the past five years, it has become evident Callery Pear cultivars have produced viable seed and become invasive. A local example is the vacant lot on US 52 W between the MED Institute office (the former Great Lakes headquarters) and Applebee’s. The multi-acre tract is covered with Callery Pear, most in flower as of mid-April.


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The above image, taken in the fall of 2012 in a vacant commercial lot in West Lafayette, is a good example of seedlings showing fall color.

Until seedless cultivars of Callery Pear are developed, this is a tree that should not be planted despite the many desirable ornamental characteristics.


The easiest way to set up a meeting with the GardenArt team to discuss your vision for improving your outdoor living space is to fill out the simple GardenArt contact form, click HERE. Do it today!



Join GardenArt online and help us — Make Customers for Life.


      

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